How Christian Louboutin Shape Your Body Feet

Christian Louboutin has been credited with making women’s legs look longer, creating celebrity high heel frenzies, inspiring serious lust and temporary credit card insanity in fashion editors like me, and perhaps most importantly, turning the once-overlooked sole of a shoe into a bona fide status symbol. So just how did his highly coveted cherry cheap louboutins red soles come to be?

This week’s New Yorker has a funny and very telling profile on the shoe designer, and nestled among the many incredible anecdotes (a few of my favorites: He owns a 13th century castle where a taxidermy boar wearing a gold crown also resides; he once custom-made a pair of shoes with real ruby soles for a private client) is the story of how those red bottoms became his signature.

Back in 1993 when he had been in business for about two years, “Louboutin had thought of making a shoe inspired by Andy Warhol’s ‘Flowers.’ The prototype, a pink stacked heel with a cartoonish cloth blossom, had arrived from Italy. ‘I was very happy, because it was similar to the drawing,’ Louboutin recalled, ‘but the drawing still was stronger and I could not understand why.’ Louboutin outlet australia continued, ‘There was this big black sole, and then, thank God, there was this girl painting her nails at the time.’ Louboutin grabbed the nail polish—it was red—from the assistant and slathered it on the sole of the prototype. ‘Then it popped,’ he recalled, ‘and I thought, This is the drawing!'”

Funny how a business worth a global fortune gained its footing, so to speak, with something as teeny tiny as a bottle of nail polish, huh? Isn’t it amazing how those flashy soles really do make the shoes pop? As Louboutin tells it, “Men are like bulls. They cannot resist the red sole,” and yet if it hadn’t been for an assistant painting her nails at that exact moment, they might never have been a part of the signature Louboutin style! What do you gals think of this story? Kinda cool, huh? Discuss!

Christian Louboutins cheap is known for his shoes that featured the signature red soles. He has become one of the most sought-after designers over the past few years. His popularity grew after countless celebrities and fashionistas were notiched on the red carpets in to-die-for shoes, all featuring that signature red sole.

The History of Louboutin shoes

The cheap Louboutin shoes had a profound influence in the fashion domain. The red soles became such a huge hit that Christian Louboutin Australia went on to the extent of trade marking his red sole heels in the U.S.A. in 2007 so that no other company could make and sell it. Apart from his trademark stilettos and red soles he also let his imagination fly and went on to try new and innovative things like he came up with an entire range with transparent heels in which it seemed that flower petals were floating. The brand is the most fiercely desired shoe wears among the ladies with having a great celebrity clientele. He says that a woman’s feeling in his shoes fascinates him and gives him a reason to design shoes for them. According to him, woman want to look sexy for other, more than themselves, and this feeling gives them self confidence. Another unique feature of his shoes is that it is entirely hand-made and customised, to the extent that even the trademark is etched without any intervention of machines. The impact is very well testified by the fact Jeniffer Lopez released a song called Louboutins sydney.

Last year, we wrote about how high end fashion shoe designer Christian Louboutin* had lost a trademark lawsuit concerning the company’s attempt to block other shoe makers from making high heel shoes with red soles. Louboutin is apparently famous for its red soled shoes, but the judge in the case pointed out that this was silly and the company never should have received the trademark in the first place:

Unfortunately, on appeal, the 2nd Circuit has disagreed and said that the lower court erred — though with a specific condition. It claims that Louboutin’s red soled trademark is legitimate if and only if it’s on shoes with a different color. If the shoe itself is completely red, then others can have a red sole (which was the situation in this particular lawsuit). Still, this seems troubling, as it seems to flat out limit reasonable design choices that other shoemakers might choose to make. The court goes through the caselaw history on colors as trademark, and the question of whether or not a color is “functional” or not (trademarks can’t be functional).
there’s at least a high likelihood that if you mention “Louboutin” in your comment that it will be held by the spam filter. We’ll endeavor to free this as quickly as possible. Or just don’t mention it in your comment at all, and hopefully it’ll get through…